Category: lists

Jul 27 2012

Hot Tips and Top Picks: DVDs, Blu-rays and Digital Debuts for the week of July 24

New Releases:

The Deep Blue Sea” (Music Box), adapted from Terence Rattigan’s play by Terence Davies, is a ravishing and devastating, a romantic drama of impossible love between the cultured wife (Rachel Weisz) of a loving older husband and a hot-tempered working class war veteran (Tom Hiddleston) in the years after World War II. Davies’ direction is graceful and intimate and loving, embracing her story as both tragic and liberating. Blu-ray, DVD, and On Demand. Videodrone’s review is here.

Silent House” (Universal), a horror film starring Elizabeth Olsen, is more than simply a haunted house movie. This remake of the Oscar nominated “La Casa Muda” from Uruguay is, in the words of MSN film critic Kat Murphy, “head-trip territory.” Blu-ray, DVD, and On Demand.

Brake” (IFC) is another claustrophobic thriller, this one starring Stephen Dorff as a Secret Service agent trapped in a Plexiglass box in the trunk of car. Blu-ray and DVD.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi” (Magnolia) is a documentary portrait of the most celebrated sushi chef in the world. Blu-ray, DVD, and On Demand.

From Israel comes the satire “Footnote” (Sony), one of five Academy Award nominees for Best Foreign Language Film (Blu-ray, DVD, and On Demand), and from Norway is “The Monitor” (Lionsgate), a thriller starring Noomi Rapace (DVD only).

Browse the complete New Release Rack here

TV on Disc:

Boss: Season One” (Lionsgate), the acclaimed Starz original series, stars Kelsey Grammer as the Mayor of Chicago and the reigning king of the political machine, holding on tight as he fights a degenerative disease eating away his mind. Though nowhere near as popular as its sex-and-gladiators series “Spartacus,” it’s the network’s best original series to date and Grammer sinks his teeth into the role with the ferocity it demands. Eight episodes on two discs, plus supplements, on Blu-ray and DVD.Videodrone’s review is here.

Endeavour” (PBS) is the “Inspector Morse” prequel, starring Shaun Evans as the young Detective Constable Morse on a case that takes him back to Oxford and changes the course of his career. Originally shown in the U.S. on “Masterpiece Mystery.” Blu-ray and DVD. Reviewed on Videodrone here.

Treasure Island” (Vivendi), the new mini-series adaptation made for SyFy, stars Eddie Izzard as Long John Silver and co-stars Donald Sutherland and Elijah Wood. Blu-ray and DVD.

Also new: “Inspector Lewis: Series 5” (PBS), the British mystery series shown stateside on “Masterpiece Mystery” (Blu-ray and DVD) and “Childrens Hospital: Season 3” (Warner), the live-action soap opera spoof from Cartoon Network (DVD only), plus ”Star Trek: The Next Generation – Season One” (Paramount) debuts on Blu-ray.

Flip through the TV on Disc Channel Guide here

Cool and Classic:

Jean Grémillon During the Occupation (Eclipse Series 34)” (Criterion) casts a welcome spotlight on the work of a French director little known outside of France, notably a trio of films he directed during the German occupation that are considered his best work: “Remorques” (1941) starring Jean Gabin, “Lumière d’été” (1943), and “Le ciel est à vous” (1944). Let the rediscovery begin. DVD only, with essays. Videodrone’s review is here.

Institute Benjamenta” (Zeitgeist), first live action film from surrealist animators The Brothers Quay, is remastered for a new DVD edition, along with a 2007 short from the  filmmakers.

Derek Jarman’s 1988 “The Last of England” (Kino) is also remastered for DVD and its Blu-ray debut, and “Kunoichi” (Sentai) is a Japanese Ninja thriller from 2011 (DVD only).

Plus Warner Archive releases three films from Jean Negulesco’s early noir period, including “Three Strangers” and “Nobody Lives Forever,” on their MOD service. Reviewed on Videodrone here.

All of the Cool and Classic here

Blu-ray Debuts:

Star Trek: The Next Generation – Season One” (Paramount) follows the original series in making the leap to Blu-ray, newly mastered from the original film elements and filled with supplements. Videodrone’s review is here.

Metropolitan” (Criterion) was the confident and witty feature debut for director Whit Stillman, and his 1998  “The Last Days of Disco” (Criterion) his third and most popular film, and for more than a decade his final film (until “Damsels in Distress” this year). Both arrive on Blu-ray from Criterion in new high-definition masters with the old director commentary from the earlier DVD releases.

They Made Me a Fugitive” (Kino), probably the closest the British cinema ever came to creating a true film noir, is a grim crime thriller starring Trevor Howard on a mission of revenge. Reviewed on Videodrone here.

Peruse all the new Blu-rays here

New on Netflix Instant:

Army of Crime” (2009) is not a “Dirty Dozen”-style thriller but an engrossing war drama from Robert Guédiguian based on a true story of a resistance force in Nazi-occupied Paris formed of French Jews, communists and immigrants—the very “undesirables” targeted by the Nazis.

Miranda July’s “The Future” (2011) is an offbeat comedy about a hip young couple adrift in stasis and self-doubt, narrated by a shelter cat awaiting adoption.

Mark “Mutant Girls Squad” (2010) down for you “WTF?!” viewing, a truly insane, exceedingly violent, tongue-in-cheek action movie from Japan about teenage girls with crazy powers unleashed on the world.

Also new: “An Officer and a Gentleman” (1982) with Richard Gere and Debra Winger, “Flirting with Disaster” (1996) with Ben Stiller and Patricia Arquette, and the cinema documentaries “Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired” (2008) and “Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff” (2010).

Browse more Instant offerings here

New On Demand

Available On Demand same day as home video is “The Deep Blue Sea” with Rachel Weisz, the horror film “Silent House” with Elizabeth Olsen, “Footnote” from Israel and the documentary “Jiro Dreams of Sushi.” See New Releases above.

Available on Friday, in advance of its theatrical release, is the thriller “The Good Doctor” with Orlando Bloom and Riley Keough.

Available from Redbox this week:

Day and date with video stores: “Brake” on Blu-ray and DVD and “My Way” and “Meeting Evil” on DVD only. See New Releases above.

Also arriving in Redbox kiosks this week: “Mirror Mirror” with Julia Roberts and Lily Collins (in Blu-ray and DVD, reviewed here) and “Intruders” with Clive Owen (reviewed here). Flashback release of the week: “The Machinist,” a 2004 psychological thriller starring pre-Batman Christian Bale.

For a calendar of upcoming releases, click here

Jan 02 2012

15th Annual Online Film Critics Society Awards

The Tree of Life, which led the Online Film Critics Society nominations with seven, was the big winner at the 15th Annual Online Film Critics Society Awards. The film took home the prize for Best Picture as well as trophies for Best Director (Terrence Malick), Best Supporting Actress (Jessica Chastain), Best Editing and Best Cinematography. No other film won more than one award.

The other three acting winners were Michael Fassbender winning Best Actor for his performance in Shame; Tilda Swinton’s work in We Need to Talk About Kevin won the award for Best Actress; and Christopher Plummer received the Best Supporting Actor prize for his work in Beginners.

The full list of winners of the 15th Annual Online Film Critics Society Awards:

Best Picture:
The Tree of Life

Best Animated Feature:
Rango

Best Director:
Terrence Malick – The Tree of Life

Best Lead Actor:
Michael Fassbender – Shame

Best Lead Actress:
Tilda Swinton – We Need to Talk About Kevin

Best Supporting Actor:
Christopher Plummer – Beginners

Best Supporting Actress:
Jessica Chastain – The Tree of Life

Best Original Screenplay:
Midnight in Paris

Best Adapted Screenplay:
Tinker Tailor Solider Spy

Best Editing:
The Tree of Life

Best Cinematography:
The Tree of Life

Best Film Not in the English Language:
A Separation

Best Documentary:
Cave of Forgotten Dreams

Special Awards (previously announced):
To Jessica Chastain, the breakout performer of the year
To Martin Scorsese in honor of his work and dedication to the pursuit of film preservation

Founded in 1997, the Online Film Critics Society has been the key force in establishing and raising the standards for Internet-based film journalism. The OFCS membership consists of film reviewers, journalists and scholars based in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Latin America and the Asia/Pacific Rim region. For more information, visit the Online Film Critics Society at ofcs.org.

Dec 21 2011

The 10 Best Reasons to Celebrate the Seattle Film Scene in 2011

For Seattle cinema lovers, 2011 was a good news/bad news year. For the bad, there was the May closure of the Columbia City Cinema and the February conversion of the Neptune into a music and events hall. The empty Uptown reminded us of another neighborhood theater with history gone dark. And the rush to digital projection in the minimally manned multiplexes left too many screens getting dimmer because of 2-D digital prints run through 3-D splitters (no, it’s not your eyes going bad) and more digital prints replacing 35mm screenings of classic films. But let’s not forget the good. Here are the 10 best reasons for movie-loving Seattleites to celebrate this year.

1) SIFF saves the Uptown! And in the same year the Seattle International Film Festival left its McCaw Hall time-share for its own year-round theater/permanent headquarters at Seattle Center. The Uptown deal came together more quickly (over the past year), and its October reopening gave SIFF four screens with both film and digital capabilities. Two blocks apart, the two venues will expand local access to the kinds of foreign, art-house, and independent films that other cities can experience only on Netflix and VOD.

2) The Cinerama 70mm Festival. Paul Allen just gave his pet movie palace a costly new renovation, and brought in independent management (Greg Wood of Portland’s Roseway Theater) to replace national operator AMC. So while it can and does show big blockbusters and digital 3-D, the Cinerama celebrated its makeover in September with 16 days of 70mm and Cinerama prints of classic films (the original high-def). Change is inevitable, but every movie lover deserves to see the texture and color of actual film.

Continue reading at  Seattle Weekly

Dec 21 2011

Voices Off – The Village Voice Film Poll

The 2011 Village Voice Film Poll is out and I once again was invited to participate.

The only disappointment for me is that I was unable  to see two of the films that made the Top Ten compilation list: Margaret (still hasn’t screened for Seattle critics and no Fox offered no DVD screeners) and A Separation (that did screen in Seattle, but only after the poll deadline).

On the bright side, my top four films all placed in the compilation Top Ten. Which ones are those? You’ll have to can see my list here.

Just for the record, and because it’s no surprise, The Tree of Life took the top spot, just as it did for the Indiewire survey and the MSN poll.

Jan 21 2011

Senses of Cinema World Poll 2010

The 2010 World Poll from Senses of Cinema is now up. I contributed a list (with comments) here, and I finally got to include my favorite film screening of 2010 in a list: Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (which opens in the U.S. in 2011).

Jan 03 2011

The OFCS Awards Announced… and The Social Network wins again

The Online Film Critics Society (of which yours truly is a member) announced the winners of the 14th Annual Online Film Critics Society Awards on the morning of Monday, January 3. And here they are…

Picture: The Social Network
Director: David Fincher, The Social Network
Actor: Colin Firth, The King’s Speech
Actress: Natalie Portman, Black Swan
Supporting Actor: Christian Bale, The Fighter
Supporting Actress: Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit
Original Screenplay: Christopher Nolan, Inception
Adapted Screenplay: Aaron Sorkin, The Social Network
Foreign Language Film: Mother (South Korea)
Documentary: Exit Through The Gift Shop
Animated Feature: Toy Story 3
Cinematography: Roger Deakins, True Grit
Editing: Lee Smith, Inception

The complete announcement is at the OFCS website here.

Dec 31 2010

Best DVD / Blu-ray of 2010

Best-of lists are by their nature subjective things, and even more so when it comes to DVD/Blu-ray. What makes a DVD release the “best”? The movie itself? The video and audio quality of the mastering and presentation? The supplements? Rarity of the title? Scope of the collection? Critical acclaim? Cult demand? Some inexplicable balance of some or all of these?

Well, I guess the latter is the closest we’ll come to quantifying the mysterious process, which is why rather than the usual Top Ten list, I’ve broken my picks into categories, so I can celebrate a box set achievement separately from a brilliant home video debut separately from a landmark restoration. Which is not to say this list is not run through with my own subjective judgments, simply that I have found my own way to spread the love around (including naming runners-up as my whims take me). I reviewed most (though not all) of these on various websites (including Parallax View) and have linked to these longer pieces wherever possible.

And for the 2010 release that I love most, allow me to present my…

DVD Release of the Year

Three Silent Classics by Josef Von Sternberg (Criterion)

Josef von Sternberg is the great stylist of the thirties, a Hollywood maverick with a taste for visual exoticism and baroque flourishes (which prompted David Thomson to dub him “the first poet of underground cinema”), but step back into his silent work and you’ll find a storyteller of unparalleled talent and one of the great directors of silent cinema.

Continue reading at Parallax View.

Dec 26 2010

Best of 2010 – The Village Voice / LA Weekly Poll

Once again, I was honored with an invitation to participate in the annual Village Voice / LA Weekly Film Critics’ Poll. (It went live earlier this week but I’ve been out for Christmas and let things slide a bit.) The list is slightly different from my MSN list, and even though it was published after the MSN poll, its deadline was earlier, so this was a bit more spontaneous, a little less worked over.

The introduction to the poll and its results are here. The compilation results are here, but you can go here to jump directly to the individual lists. My lists (top ten films plus picks for best performers, directors and others) are here.

Dec 14 2010

Best of 2010 on MSN

Go ahead. Make my list.

I’ve been slow updating the DVD pages here because I’ve been pouring through end-of-the-year releases and writing up lists and essays to go along with them.

The first of those lists is now up at MSN, where I joined twelve other critics and film writers in a collective survey of the best of the year. The feature, which counts down the compilation list with accompanying essays, starts here.

My piece is here (no spoilers from me; you’ll have to click through to find out) and you can view the individual lists (not just mine, but lists from friends and colleagues Jim Emerson, Richard T. Jameson, Glenn Kenny, Kim Morgan, Kathleen Murphy and others) starting here.

More to come as the screenings continue and I watch (and rewatch) the 2010 offerings.

Apr 01 2010

The Top Ten Films of the Next Decade – An April Fools Day Special

Happy April Fools Day. For years I have been pitching pieces to MSN for the April Fools Day edition of the Entertainment site. This year they accepted my modest tribute to this magnificent holiday: The Top Ten Films of the Next Decade. Think of it as a speculative list, based on careful reading of the careers, themes, artistic aspirations and economic models of the present, which I then tossed out for all this made up shit. Enjoy. Also note, this top ten list has twelve entries.

You can’t make this stuff up. Well OK, you can make this stuff up, and that’s the fun of looking ahead. I mean, why wait until the last minute to make a 10-best list? To get a jump on the rush, we’ve put on our prognostication caps, hit the flash-forward button and come back from the future with this snapshot of the 10 best films of the 2010s. We were just as surprised as you at the results.

“The Matrix: Devolution” (The Wachowski Brothers Siblings)
After the bizarre journey of Larry Wachowski’s transformation into Lana and a hermitlike retreat following the debacle of “Speed Racer” (only recently resurrected as a subversive blast of cinematic surrealism), the Wachowski Siblings relaunched their brand with a return trip to the virtual world that made their fame and fortune. Drawing liberally from the New Testament, the New Wave and various volumes of “Chicken Soup for the Soul,” “Devolution” pairs the messianic Neo with a sassy Southern society lady (Sandra Bullock, back with Keanu Reeves for the first time since “Speed“) who gets caught in the program while playing what she thinks is a cutting-edge version of fantasy football. Impressed with his ability to surf the Web and dodge bullets at the same time, she tries to adopt the jacked-up orphan and ends up marrying him rather than face deportation. The virtual romantic comedy of cyber-geddon took the country by storm: “Titanic” meets “Tron” with a dose of Southern comfort and a flashback soundtrack that turned “Freedom of Choice” and “Mongoloid” into anthems for the new generation of techno-rebels.

Read the entire piece at MSN here.

Jan 05 2010

Hurt so Good: The 2009 OFCS Awards

I confess that I’ve been both proud and chagrined at the winners of previous Online Film Critics  Society awards. This year, I couldn’t be more proud to put my name behind the list of winners. They’re not all MY top choice, but they do make a statement that I’m happy to stand behind.

The awards, announced on the evening of January 5, 2010, are as follows:

Best Picture: The Hurt Locker
Best Director: Kathryn Bigelow, The Hurt Locker
Best Actor: Jeremy Renner, The Hurt Locker
Best Actress: Melanie Laurent, Inglourious Basterds
Best Supporting Actor: Christoph Waltz, Inglourious Basterds
Best Supporting Actress: Mo’Nique, Precious
Best Original Screenplay: Quentin Tarantino, Inglourious Basterds
Best Adapted Screenplay: Wes Anderson and Noah Baumbach, Fantastic Mr. Fox, based on a book by Roald Dahl
Best Documentary: Anvil!: The Story of Anvil
Best Picture Not in the English Language: The White Ribbon
Best Animated Feature: Up
Best Cinematography: Robert Richardson, Inglourious Basterds
Best Score: Michael Giacchino, Up
Best Editing: Chris Innis and Bob Murawski, The Hurt Locker

The complete press release can be found on the OFCS New Blog here.

Jan 01 2010

Best of 2009 on DVD

I did the conventional “Best of 2009 on DVD and Blu-ray” for MSN here but I’ve been having some fun exploring the less heralded releases of 2009 for Parallax View. In fact, many of the reviews originally appeared on this blog but I’ve organized them into something resembling a series of features. If you feel like revisiting some of the releases that flew under the radar of the mainstream DVD coverage, check out these pieces:

Ten DVD Releases That Made 2009 Great

DVD Discoveries and Rediscoveries 2009

TV on DVD 2009 – The Great, the Rediscovered and the Timeless

Good Things in Big Packages: DVD Box Sets of 2009

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